Retirement Options

HorseChannel.com Message Board
Rules-Read First    Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On
Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        

Home » HorseChannel.com Forums » Senior Horse Care » Retirement Options Join the Club


Retirement Options Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 2/11/2010 1:52:19 PM


Junior Member

Junior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 7:00:35 AM
Posts: 356, Visits: 2,837
This week's featured question is about finding a good retirement home for an older horse.

http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-experts/horse-management/horse-retirement-home.aspx

I'm wondering if anyone has experience with equine retirement facilities. Though I think most of us prefer to keep our oldies in our care for as long as possible, retirement farms can be a good option if you don't have adequate space or time for a retiree. 

For those of you who own senior horses, would you consider a retirement home for your horse once you stop riding him? Have you ever looked into a facility, or do you know anyone who has?



Make your horse famous and earn 1000 Club Horse points! Upload your horse videos at HorseChannel.com/Video.
Post #314948
Posted 2/13/2010 10:29:20 PM


New Member

New MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 3/22/2014 5:19:46 PM
Posts: 98, Visits: 158
Sending your loyal equine companion off to some cheap board dumping ground to salve your conscience is a cop out. I've seen horses 'warehoused' like this, owners coming to see them annually if at all... no brushing, no hoof care, minimal vet care, that's what 'retirement facilities' are all about.

If your horse has become 'inconvenient' due to age have the guts to put them down if you don't have the strength of character to take care of them in their senior years.
Post #315049
Posted 2/21/2010 7:28:37 AM


Starting Member

Starting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 2/25/2010 2:50:20 PM
Posts: 8, Visits: 10
I actually became a horses retirement care taker. My old mare was out in a pasture with no buddies, no job. She was fed well but the owner couldnt keep her anymore. I knew she would be expensive to keep, researched plenty, she wasnt my first elderly horse, and she wont be my last. Ive had horses my whole life, and I still learn something new everyday.

I told the lady that owned her that I was going to give her a forever home, and I will keep my promiss. I commited to her and will until the moment she takes  her last breath. I monitor her health every single day, I adjust her feed and take lots of pictures. It was by comparring these pictures that I noticed a slight weight loss that I might have missed by seeing her everyday. I upped her senior feed and now she is back on track. She deserves and has earned the extra care she receives. I still ride her every day, and when she cant be ridden anymore, I will still walk her every day to keep her limber. Its all about commitment.

All I need are these two things, a good horse and a donkey to pay for it.

Post #315315
Posted 2/21/2010 8:29:12 PM


New Member

New MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew MemberNew Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 3/22/2014 5:19:46 PM
Posts: 98, Visits: 158
You're wonderful to take in an old horse. I've seen too many dumped at the rescue that I volunteer at, after decades of working as school or show horses or being someone's companion thrown away like a worn out appliance. They are the ones that are most heartbreaking, they crave individual companionship of a human, sometimes even more than that of other horses. The old ones are the most trustworthy, the ones that everyone who visits wants to ride, knowing they're a safe and secure mount. But no one ever takes them home, the young horses are the ones that get adoped, and the seniors go back to their stalls.
Post #315344
Posted 2/21/2010 10:14:02 PM
Starting Member

Starting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 6/5/2011 2:48:48 PM
Posts: 7, Visits: 6
I love those "golden oldies" and do have a small boarding facility for retired show horses.  I think it's important to determine just what you mean by "retirement."  I receive many calls who just want to give me their horse to take care of for them as they are too old to retire.  There are places that do just take on these senior citizens and I wonder if those are the non-profit organizations you are talking about that survive on donations.

I am actually a business and have a small stable on my property.  I charge board and services, just like most stables do.  The difference is that my client's horses have stalls (for meals) with huge paddocks and, whenever good weather allows, they are turned out together in a big pasture. 

Other retirement facilities I know about have huge pastures with run-in sheds and the horses like outdoors like a herd. 

Either option is great for a horse.  We both have regular check-ins on the horses, make sure they are dewormed, have all their shots and checked by my vet, and have their hoofs trimmed every 8 weeks.  I send emails and pictures to my clients whenever I see their horse doing something funny or interesting. 

Depending on where the client lives, they may come out to visit their horse.  I don't have any riding facilities, but some retirement barns may be a regular barn as well and may have an arena in case you want to ride.

Make sure you feel comfortable with the person who is going to be taking care of your horse.  Remember that person is going to be doing all the things that you usually do - looking for lumps, making sure they aren't lame, handling minor cuts and bruises.  Ask for their qualificiations and ask for references, especially from their vet and past clients.

I love looking out my kitchen window and seing those senior citizens having a great time rolling in the dirt or just grazing.  I'd strongly consider anyone who owns a stable and has the room to consider adding senior care as an additional service.

For guidelines on operating a retirement facility, check out the American Association of Equine Practitioner's web site at www.aaep.org.  Or feel free to contact me directly.

Horse information for horse people from

Post #315346
Posted 9/30/2011 1:12:26 AM
Starting Member

Starting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting MemberStarting Member

Group: Banned Members
Last Login: 3/20/2012 3:43:22 AM
Posts: 2, Visits: 8
I'm older than her and she now upped the feed back on track. She should have already won the extra care she received. I still ride her every day, when she can't ride, I will still go exercise every day, she keeps her plastic. All of that is a promise....



-----------------------
the addams family seasons 1-3 dvd boxset
the apprentice seasons 1-11 dvd boxset
Post #362995
Posted 10/12/2011 9:05:08 PM
Advanced Member

Advanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced MemberAdvanced Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 6:14:50 PM
Posts: 3,437, Visits: 2,610
[quote]neeiji (2/21/2010)
I actually became a horses retirement care taker. My old mare was out in a pasture with no buddies, no job. She was fed well but the owner couldnt keep her anymore. I knew she would be expensive to keep, researched plenty, she wasnt my first elderly horse, and she wont be my last. Ive had horses my whole life, and I still learn something new everyday.

I told the lady that owned her that I wasgoing to give her a forever home, and I will keep my promiss. I commited to her and will until the moment she takes her last breath. I monitor her health every single day, I adjust her feed and take lots of pictures. It was by comparring these pictures that I noticed a slight weight loss that I might have missed by seeing her everyday. I upped her senior feed and now she is back on track. She deserves and has earned the extra care she receives. I still ride her every day, and when she cant be ridden anymore, I will still walk her every to keep her limber. Its all about commitment.[/quote]day


Thats awesome so glad you took the horse!![]


Post #364589
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »


Reading This Topic Expand / Collapse
Active Users: 1 (1 guest, 0 members, 0 anonymous members)
No members currently viewing this topic.
Forum Moderators: Assistant Moderator

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT -8:00, Time now is 10:44pm

Powered By InstantForum.NET v4.1.2 © 2014
Execution: 0.313. 10 queries. Compression Disabled.