Gypsy Vanners good for beginners???

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Gypsy Vanners good for beginners??? Expand / Collapse
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Posted 4/14/2011 10:31:50 PM
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I read that Gypsy Vanners are great for beginners/children/trail riding, is this true? I'm interested in getting one if so.
Thanks!
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Post #342563
Posted 4/15/2011 7:49:39 AM


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all breeds of horses are good beginner horses. when looking for a horse, go by whats best for you, not breed wise, look at temperament.

Post #342568
Posted 4/15/2011 8:05:05 AM


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Gracie53 (4/15/2011)
all breeds of horses are good beginner horses. when looking for a horse, go by whats best for you, not breed wise, look at temperament.


Agreed. It depends on the temperament and personality of the individual horse, not their breed. Age and how well trained they are also very important. Breed and color should be the last two things you look at when buying a horse, unless you're already involved in showing or breeding a specific breed of horse.

(Gypsy Vanners also tend to be very expensive, so keep that in mind. Their feathers also take a lot of work to keep clean.)


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Post #342570
Posted 4/15/2011 9:31:58 AM


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I don't think drafts are good for beginners unless you find a very rare exception. They are just completely different horses to ride and train and you really have to know what your doing and it could be really dangerous if you don't. Recently I saw a lady thrown off an extremely well broke Gypsy and this lady was a good rider and it was a good horse. Now I'm not saying its just the breed because accidents happen but it launched her into a gate and it landed her in the hospital. So if you think yourself capable of dealing with the extra power they have and the extra spookiness of drafts in general then go for it. But I would say no.




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Post #342573
Posted 4/15/2011 1:59:05 PM


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Horselover12345 - I've ridden a number of drafts and draft crosses, including a couple of gypsies, and I own a Belgian draft x tb and I've never noticed them to be prone to being spooky. In fact, my experience with drafts is that they are less prone to being spooky than light horses.

I had one gypsy gelding I rode for about two years, and I can honestly say that while I enjoyed riding him, and he was a fun, easy going horse to ride (and great on trail) - it was because he was a fun, easy going, good trail horse as an individual. Other gypsies I've worked with have been more difficult - there are general characteristics that are prominent within each breed or type, and I would say that usually, drafts/cobs are bred to be gentle, people-oriented, and even-tempered. However, I do agree with Horselover that drafts and cobs are very different from light horses and require different care, feeding, handling and accommodation as a result.

For the most part, though, I think that gypsy horses in the US are highly overpriced, hairy spotted cobs. They have a lot of publicity and hype surrounding them, and while they can be quite pretty - their practical uses are pretty much limited to being a cart horse or a recreational trail horse. And frankly, I think it makes a lot more sense to buy one as a driving horse than a trail horse. You can find a good, dependable, sound, well-trained, and even pretty family-friendly trail horse for $2,000 or less - so why spend $10,000 + for a gypsy that is going to cost more to feed, more to trim/shoe, more to care for in terms of money and labor? Better to buy a nice stock horse (Quarter Horse, Paint, Appy, etc) with all the right qualities for around $1,000-ish and then invest any extra cash you might have on outfitting said horse with the best quality tack you can get.


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Post #342586
Posted 4/20/2011 10:32:55 PM
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any breed can be good for a beginner, it really depends on the horse. i also agree with woodrows mommy. while it is nice to daydream about riding around a big flashy horse, its much better to spend less money on a sound, even tempered horse that suits your personality and family. the extra money can go to building a good barn or getting a couple of saddles and some excellent riding boots or putting into savings for the vet/feed/farrier bills that all horses accrue.

i am just getting back into the sport, and its fun to look at the expensive flashy breeds online like friesans and gypsys and think about owning one. but when it comes time for me to start really looking for my own horse, i'll likely get an older adult Quarter Horse or Thoroughbred or something similar that is sound and experienced in the discipline i ride in. also there are so many horses in rescues around the country that need loving homes and will make great mounts.


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He carries me away from all my fears
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His mane is there to wipe away my tears."
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Post #343036
Posted 4/21/2011 8:56:44 AM


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everyone else is right you're better to look for temperment on the ground and in the saddle not breed theres always certin cases in every breed even thoes that are supposed to be super docile that act up.

Horselover12345- My brother who is 9 now learned when he was 2 how to ride off of a completley unbroke perchron mare and she never even spooked once and she was used as a parade horse so she had light up noise making bouncey balls bounced in front of her and never did a thing.




my boyfriend asked me to choose between him and my horse... I'm really gonna miss that man!

Post #343043
Posted 4/21/2011 4:53:24 PM


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The awesome-ness of QHRider's signature almost made me die. Aha! I LOVE it.

             

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