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Posted By My Santana Taz 2 Years Ago
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My Santana Taz
Posted 2 Years Ago
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Santana has always had not-the-greatest feet. We plan to shoe him next time the farrier comes, to help a bit with cracking and chipping, but that's 2 weeks from now. I can tell his feet are sore(I'm pretty sure he has thrush in one of his front feet, but I know how to take care of that) and they are chipped pretty bad. I put conditioner on them when I get the chance, but our week is just too busy to drive to the barn everyday to see him, etc. Yesterday I went out and you could see a slight difference in hs walk, but I decided unless I could feel it while riding it really wasn't anything, as the horses get sore feet sometimes. But I felt it. So is there anything I can do to help his feet? Like I said, he gets shoed next time the farrier comes, but for now do I just carry on like normal? It's only a slight difference, but still obvious. Oh, he doesn't get any food, just constant grass and hay.

Sorry the novel, I thought it was nessacary.



horseless722
Posted 2 Years Ago
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I hope you are treating the possible thrush everyday because that is the only way if it is thrush to be rid of it no matter what you are using for what ever it stuff says on the bottle..





conditioning the hoof is "ok" but will only do so much becuse inorder to really effect the hoof one must do something from the inside out. A hoof supplement such as ferriers formula, or grand meddows hoof supplement I cant think of the name right now mind drawing a blank. would yes they can be pricey but they are the only way the improve the condition of the hoof you would have to start to feed just a hand full of grain to go with the supplement though and on that end because you would be feeding so little wht a few ozs. a day you will want to stay away fron the sweet feed for no other reason other than it will go moldy before you feed it all.

That is if you want to go the supplement route.



Right now all your doing is making his hoof look nice and smoothing the chips. cracks, etc. Hey I do it to for the same reason one a week and when I was showing 2x a week and between each class. so ...



If ponies were human.. most would be in prison.

Mrs. Smith COTH


Zee
Posted 2 Years Ago
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Like Horseless said, the conditioner is treating the effect of the problem, but does absolutely nothing to address the cause, which is nutrition (and largely genetics, but we can't do much about that). I had good results with Smarthoof Pellets for Halo, and then I switched him over to Grand Hoof +MSM because I got the benefit of a little joint support for the same price and hoof ingredients as the Smarthoof. Both run about $17 a month, so not too bad. I've also heard good things about the ones Horseless mentioned, but I've never used them myself.



The only other thing I would mention is perhaps it would be a good idea to have your farrier out more often. It turned out Halo's feet held up a lot better when he got a trim and reset every five weeks instead of six, so I guess all those cracks were happening in the sixth week. It's a little more expensive to have the farrier out a little more often, but if it means having a sound horse instead of sore one, you're probably better off.



For now, I'd stick to only light riding on a forgiving surface. Soft sand or nice grass are good, and avoid riding on hard, dry ground or on gravel. If he really feels off while you're riding, I'd give him some time off.



Edited 2 Years Ago by zeesgirl
Hibiscus
Posted 2 Years Ago
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Honestly? Don't shoe him. That cracks are proving that he already has weak and brittle hooves. Nail holes won't help that. Don't put conditioner all over the hoof, just the coronary band. That's the only place that can actively use conditioners. Anywhere else on the hoof and you are just causing the hoof to be unable to regulate its own moisture balance. Hard, dry hooves are actually what you are aiming for. Cracking is usually caused by one or both of two things. Improper trim and/or too long of a trimming cycle. Your horse just may be inable to handle how long he's going between trims. Your farrier may be leaving flare, leaving a long breakover, etc. The others are absolutely correct that diet impacts hoof quality.



Any chance of pics?



My Santana Taz
Posted 2 Years Ago
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Maybe, not sure when I'm going out next. Hopefully, withing the next few years we'll have our own barn on our own property, and that will fix a lot of problems, but for now, I'm lucky to have Santana. >_<  I only ride on grass, and it's not a big off, just a bit different, but before I had Santana, I took the acaisonal lesson, but other than that, everything I knew was from books, the interenet, and other horse people. But I've come a long way from then. Smile Thanks for your answers, I'll try to get pics.



MerryLittleMare
Posted 2 Years Ago
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I wouldn't shoe him, like Hibiscus said. Sounds like he already has thin, shelly hooves, and driving a nail into them might end up ripping a chink out of the hoof wall. I see it all the time where a horse is shod, and a couple of days later a small chunk is missing from either the front or side of the hoof, due to poor hoof quality. Conditioning might correct the outside of the problem, but this seems like a nutritional problem, from the inside.

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