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Building a relationship with your horse

Posted By Live&breathfreisians Last Year
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Live&breathfreisians
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What methods do y'all use to build a strong bond/relationship with your horse? I hear the Monty Roberts join up method works well in this aspect. What trainer's ideas and training methods do you use to ultimately achieve this? I'm very interested in this topic and would love to learn a bunch of different ways to build a bond with a new horse.

             

Edited Last Year by Live&breathfreisians
Woodrows Mommy
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I will say first off that I'm SO NOT a fan of Monty Roberts' Join Up. It's actually a very aggressive technique in a lot of ways, and it can intimidate a horse into submission, rather than get the horse's cooperation and obedience as intended.



As far as bonding with a horse, the best thing you can do is spend time with them. Bonding isn't really something that happens because by a force of will or a particular technique. Anything you do with a horse that sets clear boundaries and expectations will help him to know what you want from him, which will help him feel safe and confident with you.




"Quick fixes, by their nature, fix nothing; that's why they're repetitive."

-Dr. Laura


"It's better to ride even if you get thrown, then to wind up just wishing you had."

- Chris LeDoux



Updated 10/17/2011!

http://rideweek.blogspot.com/





Live&breathfreisians
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Well if you don't like that method what is an alternative you like to gain respect and bond?

             

Edited Last Year by Live&breathfreisians
On Par
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Forget about 'bonding' and 'relationships.' Start by gaining your horse's respect. All else flows from that.

You gain a horse's respect by moving his feet - forwards, backwards, left, and right, always rewarding the slightest try.

You can gain a horse's respect in three ways, by creating movement, redirection movement, or inhibiting movement. That last way is typically reserved for imprinting foals, severe problem horses, or very very broke horses, as it can easily get dangerous.



Move the feet. Create and redirect movement/energy. When you can move your horse's feet anywhere you want any way you want with a sublte, soft, or quiet cue, and your horse knows this, you will have acheived a 'bond', that is, a level of communication and respect that you never realized was possible.

If you keep doing the same thing, you'll keep getting the same thing.



littleredkelpie
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And no matter what technique you use, relationships only happen with time and consistency. Every time you work with your horse, you're working on your relationship.

Cheap Tricks and Cheesy One Liners



dddddddd
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Spend time with your horse. Do some groundwork, work on manners, and groom your horse. Don't just jump on, ride, and trow the horse back into the pasture/stall. Trust and time builds relationships and bonding.

DD and Jazzi

JSwain
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Every thing you do in your horse's presence affects your relationship either for the good or the bad. So focus on positive reinforcement and noticing the smallest try and reward it.



This life, everyday is filled with wonder and mystery.





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